Archive for the ‘issue 7’ Category

Varieties of Tea in Korea *By Brother Anthony of Taize, with Hong Kyeong-Hee

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

We are honored to have such experts on Korean tea join The Leaf in contributing to the free spread of Cha Dao.

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A Guide to Wuyi Mountain Cliff Tea

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

This comprehensive guide to the “Tea of the Immortals” is a wonderful resource, compiled from many articles, interviews and translations.

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Yixing Purple-sand Teapots, the Father of Tea

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

We continue our Yixing series with another article by Peng Le Jing, which briefly summarizes the history of Yixing teaware in the Qing Dynasty.

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Further Discussions of Quality *By Wu De and Thomas Leons

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

In this article, we dive deeper into what quality means in tea, teaware and tea preparation.

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Gong Fu Tea Tips

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

Each issue we explore some of the methodology in traditional tea preparation. This issue we go way back to the earliest method.

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In The Zendo

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

Each issue we explore a bit of why Tea and Zen are of one flavor; this time with an article by Thomas Leons.

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After Hearing a Monk of Shu Play the Lute *By Erick Smithe

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

In this insightful article, we explore the relationship between tea and the ancient Chinese poets.

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Fallen Leaves

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

This is where we publish a bit of tea-inspired fiction. This issue we continue with ‘The lost Tales, Part II” by Wu De

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Discussion of Issue 7

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

Discuss all of this issue here.

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This issue's poetry:

 

 

Unless there is light, how can there be shadow?

And unless there is shadow, how can we know the light?

We cannot have darkness without light.

And we cannot notice light without dark.

 

When we undertake to study shadows, we must not be deceived by their appearances.

They are always cast from something:

To understand a shadow, understand its source.

 

Can you be like the legendary sages of old—

Who cast no shadows?

Will you do as they did?

Eating so little that you become ether?

 

Far better is it to return to the source,

Which neither illuminates nor obscures,

Which neither projects nor is cast.

Far better is it to return to the Tao.

 

—Deng Ming Dao, Everyday Tao

 

 

 

You devas should know that all such forms are taught by the buddhas according to the ways of the world, and not according to the inexpressible meaning.

 

    —The Buddha,

Prajnaparamitta Sutta

 

 

 

If and until you have tried a fine tea, it is too hard to tell.  

 

    —Master Lin Ping Xiang—

 

 

 

 

 

 

Staff

Editor in Chief

Aaron Fisher (Wu De)

 

Editors

Jochen Bind

Jeffrey McCloud

Thomas Leons

Erick Smithe

Ethan Thompson

Dan Fisher

Aaron Davis

Norpel

 

Translators

Aaron Davis

Tsai Zhen Shin

Avon Yang