26 Mountains, 50 cakes; A review by Ethan Thompson

December 24th, 2008

Read through this review of Jing Mei Tang’s new Puerh set that samples each of the 26 tea growing regions of Yunnan.

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Puerh Storage, Aged and Aging Tea–Part I by Aaron Fisher

December 24th, 2008

An exciting two part expose on the aging of Puerh tea, providing some depth and perspective to this important issue.


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Puerh Storage, Aged and Aging Tea–Part II by Aaron Fisher

December 24th, 2008

The second part of a special two part expose on the aging of Puerh tea


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*Tea Notes by Zhang Yuan

December 24th, 2008

We are so excited to present the first in our series of translated, ancient texts on tea. Thanks for all those whose support has made this project begin bearing fruit!


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Gong Fu Tea Tips, Issue 4–The Kettle Part 1, Japanese Pure Silver

December 24th, 2008

In the first part of our discussion of the importance of the kettle, we’ve put together a wonderful article on Japanese silver kettles.

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Matcha; The Gossamer Tea Powder of Japan by Mary Lou Heiss

December 24th, 2008

An in-depth exploration into the history, production and appreciation of this amazing genre of tea we all love.

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The Master’s Call by Thomas Leons

December 24th, 2008

Don’t underestimate the importance of finding a teacher to guide your journey through tea.

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Discussion of Issue 4

December 24th, 2008

Have a sip and a talk about Issue 4 and any current news about The Leaf.

Tea Wisdom

December 24th, 2008

Share a cup of knowledge, steeped in tea

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This issue's poetry:

Searching for the Hermit in Vain

I asked the boy beneath the pines.

He said, "The master's gone alone

Herb-picking somewhere on the mount,

Cloud-hidden, whereabouts unknown."

 —Chia Dao (777-841), Translated by Lin Yu Tang, as quoted in Alan Watts Cloud-Hidden Whereabouts Unknown

 

 

 

Going to Look for Master Chang of South Stream

Everywhere along the path

In the moss,

I see the prints

Of clogs.

 

White cloud

Rest upon a quiet islet.

Fragrant plants

Bloc an idle door.

 

I see the color of the pines

After rain.

Following the mountain,

I reach the source of the stream.

 

Flowers by the water

Give Zen's meaning.

Facing them

I forget all words.

    —Lyou Chang Ching (750AD), translated by Greg Whincup in The Heart of Chinese Poetry

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visiting the Temple of Accumulated Fragrance

Not knowing the way

To the temple,

I enter several miles

Into cloudy peaks.

 

Ancient trees,

A deserted path —

Deep in the mountains

Somewhere a bell.

 

The sound of spring

Choked by towering rocks.

The color of sunlight

Chilled by green pines.

 

Near evening

At the corner of an empty pool,

Calm meditation

Subdues posion dragons

of the mind.

 —Wang Wei (750AD),

translated by Greg Whincup in The Heart of Chinese Poetry

 

 

 

 

Staff

Editor in Chief

Aaron Fisher

 

Editors

Jochen Bind

Jeffrey McCloud

Thomas Leons

Erick Smithe

Ethan Thompson

Dan Fisher

Aaron Davis

 

Translators

Aaron Davis

Tsai Zhen Shin

Avon Yang